patjarrett:

#architecture from the Handlay Library in #Winchester #Virginia at the @skylinendfilmfest

patjarrett:

#architecture from the Handlay Library in #Winchester #Virginia at the @skylinendfilmfest

2 days ago
3 notes

laughingsquid:

A Japanese Toy Train Floats on a Track Through Quantum Levitation

United States: model trains!
Japan: what is it 1860? We’ve got model quantum levitation. Get on board or get left behind.

6 days ago
194 notes

felipehenrique:

#berlin #hauptbahnhof #berlinhauptbahnhof

(via berlinhauptbahnhof)

1 week ago
4 notes
thisbigcity:


ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

This is how you do walkability. 

thisbigcity:

ClimateWorks is a San Francisco based foundation whose mission is to support public policies that prevent dangerous climate change and promote global prosperity. This infographic about wlkable neighborhoods is part of a document called Planning Cities for People, which was prepared for the Chinese government. The document, which contains 8 research-based recommendations that lead to prosperous, low-carbon urban areas, uses richly illustrated maps and diagrams to present examples of street-grids that promote walking, prioritize bicycle networks, create mixed-use neighborhoods and support high-quality transit.

This is how you do walkability. 

(Source: alexinsd)

1 week ago
620 notes
The Most Important Transportation Innovation of the Decade Is the Smartphone
Eric Goldwyn, citylab.com
So why don’t cities and transit agencies take more advantage of it?In the most recent New York City mayoral election, supermarket mogul John Catsimatidis bragged that he was the only candidate with a vision of the future worthy of the city. Whi…

The Most Important Transportation Innovation of the Decade Is the Smartphone
Eric Goldwyn, citylab.com

So why don’t cities and transit agencies take more advantage of it?

In the most recent New York City mayoral election, supermarket mogul John Catsimatidis bragged that he was the only candidate with a vision of the future worthy of the city. Whi…

(Source: smartercities)

1 day ago
11 notes
Camera Robot Made For Disney Now Inspects Bridges

txchnologist:

image

by Michael Keller

Bridges are made to transport vehicles, not to make it easy for inspectors to do their job. That’s why inspecting the undersides and support pillars of tall ones is no easy task, either requiring people looking for problems to perform feats of…

3 days ago
177 notes

transitmaps:

Photo: Tattoo based on H.C. Beck’s First Paris Métro Diagram

The inspiration for this tattoo is really quite obvious when you know what you’re looking for. This is H.C. Beck’s first unsolicited attempt at a Paris Metro diagram from around 1939, and has been reproduced quite faithfully (although without the station names). 

Source: zachhaschanged/Instagram

OH DANG INFRASTRUCTURE TATTOO

5 days ago
57 notes

The Bankruptcy of Detroit and the Division of America

corporationsarepeople:

furldman:

 

Chancellor’s Professor of Public Policy, University of California at Berkeley; author, ‘Beyond Outrage’

image

Detroit is the largest city ever to seek bankruptcy protection, so its bankruptcy is seen as a potential model for other American cities now teetering on the edge.

But Detroit is really a model for how wealthier and whiter Americans escape the costs of public goods they’d otherwise share with poorer and darker Americans.

Judge Steven W. Rhodes of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Michigan is now weighing Detroit’s plan to shed $7 billion of its debts and restore some $1.5 billion of city services by requiring various groups of creditors to make sacrifices.

Among those being asked to sacrifice are Detroit’s former city employees, now dependent on pensions and health care benefits the city years before agreed to pay. Also investors who bought $1.4 billion worth of bonds the city issued in 2005.

Both groups claim the plan unfairly burdens them. Under it, the 2005 investors emerge with little or nothing, and Detroit’s retirees have their pensions cut 4.5 percent, lose some health benefits, and do without cost-of-living increases.

No one knows whether Judge Rhodes will accept or reject the plan. But one thing is for certain. A very large and prosperous group close by won’t sacrifice a cent: They’re the mostly-white citizens of neighboring Oakland County.

Oakland County is the fourth wealthiest county in the United States, of counties with a million or more residents.

In fact, Greater Detroit, including its suburbs, ranks among the top financial centers, top four centers of high technology employment, and second largest source of engineering and architectural talent in America.

The median household in the County earned over $65,000 last year. The median household in Birmingham, Michigan, just across Detroit’s border, earned more than $94,000. In nearby Bloomfield Hills, still within the Detroit metropolitan area, the median was close to $105,000.

Detroit’s upscale suburbs also have excellent schools, rapid-response security, and resplendent parks.

Forty years ago, Detroit had a mixture of wealthy, middle class, and poor. But then its middle class and white residents began fleeing to the suburbs. Between 2000 and 2010, the city lost a quarter of its population.

By the time it declared bankruptcy, Detroit was almost entirely poor. Its median household income was $26,000. More than half of its children were impoverished.

That left it with depressed property values, abandoned neighborhoods, empty buildings, and dilapidated schools. Forty percent of its streetlights don’t work. More than half its parks closed within the last five years.

Earlier this year, monthly water bills in Detroit were running 50 percent higher than the national average, and officials began shutting off the water to 150,000 households who couldn’t pay the bills.

Official boundaries are often hard to see. If you head north on Woodward Avenue, away from downtown Detroit, you wouldn’t know exactly when you left the city and crossed over into Oakland County — except for a small sign that tells you.

But boundaries can make all the difference. Had the official boundary been drawn differently to encompass both Oakland County and Detroit — creating, say, a “Greater Detroit” — Oakland’s more affluent citizens would have some responsibility to address Detroit’s problems, and Detroit would likely have enough money to pay all its bills and provide its residents with adequate public services.

But because Detroit’s boundary surrounds only the poor inner city, those inside it have to deal with their compounded problems themselves. The whiter and more affluent suburbs (and the banks that serve them) are off the hook.

Any hint they should take some responsibility has invited righteous indignation. “Now, all of a sudden, they’re having problems and they want to give part of the responsibility to the suburbs?” scoffs L. Brooks Paterson, the Oakland County executive. “They’re not gonna’ talk me into being the good guy. ‘Pick up your share?’ Ha ha.”

Buried within the bankruptcy of Detroit is a fundamental political and moral question: Who are “we,” and what are our obligations to one another?

Are Detroit, its public employees, poor residents, and bondholders the only ones who should sacrifice when “Detroit” can’t pay its bills? Or does the relevant sphere of responsibility include Detroit’s affluent suburbs — to which many of the city’s wealthier resident fled as the city declined, along with the banks that serve them?

Judge Rhodes won’t address these questions. But as Americans continue to segregate by income into places becoming either wealthier or poorer, the rest of us will have to answer questions like these, eventually.

__________

ROBERT B. REICH’s film “Inequality for All” is now available on DVD and blu-ray, and on Netflix. Watch the trailer below:

Glad to see someone with a much larger megaphone making these same points.

1 week ago
82 notes
thisbigcity:

newurbanismfilmfestival:

Design vs human experience.

Sometimes the city tells you how it wants to be designed. Listen!

IMPORTANT

thisbigcity:

newurbanismfilmfestival:

Design vs human experience.

Sometimes the city tells you how it wants to be designed. Listen!

IMPORTANT

1 week ago
1,077 notes
newyorker:

Mikhail Iossel on a Soviet twelve days of Christmas: http://nyr.kr/1fIsZPy

“In 1979-1981, to the best of my sporadic recollections, and with the aid of some perfunctory and doubtless imprecise online research, with a hundred and twenty rubles in a large Soviet city one could afford:
12,000 boxes of matches (50 matches per box), 1,200 glasses of carbonated water (no fruit syrup) from a street vending machine, 12,000 standard pencils, 12,000 slices of bread at a public cafeteria.”

Photograph: Sovfoto/UIG/Getty.

newyorker:

Mikhail Iossel on a Soviet twelve days of Christmas: http://nyr.kr/1fIsZPy

In 1979-1981, to the best of my sporadic recollections, and with the aid of some perfunctory and doubtless imprecise online research, with a hundred and twenty rubles in a large Soviet city one could afford:

12,000 boxes of matches (50 matches per box), 1,200 glasses of carbonated water (no fruit syrup) from a street vending machine, 12,000 standard pencils, 12,000 slices of bread at a public cafeteria.

Photograph: Sovfoto/UIG/Getty.

(Source: newyorker.com, via themovinglife)

1 week ago
233 notes