transitmaps:

NEW Official Map: TriMet MAX Light Rail, Portland, Oregon

So I saw this at the MAX stop near my work yesterday, and managed to get some photos of it today. For now, the TriMet website still has the previous map, and it seems like these maps may currently be only posted along the 5th/6th Avenue transit mall downtown (any other sightings elsewhere, PDXers?)

So, what’s new?

First off is the obvious (and quite radical) change from 45-degree angles to 30/60-degrees… which can’t help but put me in mind of my own map of Portland’s rail transit, which did the same thing way back in 2011, and revised in September 2012. This map hasn’t taken the concept quite as far as my map, however, as the downtown lines still form a neat horizontal/vertical cross, rather than conforming the the 30/60 degree angles (which actually reflects the real street grid a little better).

The two streetcar lines (North-South and Central) are finally both being shown according to their official colour-coding (lime green and cyan, respectively), although no stops are named. This is actually a pretty good compromise – it’s better than the sad, unlabelled squiggle of previous maps, and it doesn’t mess with the scale of the map as much as it does on my version, where downtown has to be enlarged even more in relation to the rest of the system. The streetcar seems to stop every two blocks anyway, so you’re never that far away from the next one!

Future extensions are shown: the Orange Line to Milwaukie and the completion of the streetcar loop over the new Tillikum Crossing transit bridge. There’s some nice work on the Orange Line to get the station dots to line up properly and exactly over the dashed route line: I always appreciate attention to detail like this. The map still doesn’t tell us exactly how the Orange Line will tie in to the rest of the system: it’s just tacked onto the ends of the Yellow Line at PSU. I’ve heard rumours that southbound trains may change from Yellow to Orange at Union Station, while northbound trains will change from Orange to Yellow at SW College. I’m guessing that some Green Line trains may also change their designation, otherwise there’s really no reason why the Orange Line shouldn’t just be an extension of the existing Yellow Line in my eyes.

I also like the way that the Blue Line drops down southwards with the Green Line east of Gateway before turning again out to Gresham: accurate to real life and nicely done. I’m not so thrilled with the dinky little turns that the Green and Yellow Lines make between Union Station and the Steel Bridge. I also think it would be neater for the Green Line to cross under the Blue and Red Lines here, so that it doesn’t have to make that big right-angled turn across all the other lines out at Gateway. See my map for how this looks.

Some oddities: the Central streetcar line just completely disappears as it passes behind the MAX station labels east of the Willamette (se the right of the second picture above). Similarly, when the Red and Blue lines cross the Yellow and Green Lines downtown, the Blue Line is ghosted back so the “PORTLAND TRANSIT MALL” text can be read, but the Red Line disappears, as do the streetcar tracks when they cross the mall. Consistency is the key here: either approach has merits, but pick one and stick with it!

Finally, one of my pet peeves: stations named after sporting arenas with naming rights. It’s been PGE Park, JELD-WEN Field and now Providence Park, all in the seven years that I’ve been living here. Wouldn’t we just be better off calling the MAX Station “Stadium” and be done with it?

Our rating: Definitely an improvement on previous maps, with a sleeker, more modern feel and much better integration of the Portland Streetcar. Parts of it look eerily familiar to me, but it is also a logical progression from previous TriMet in-car maps like this one. Three stars.

3 Stars

4 hours ago
28 notes

bobbycaputo:

Here’s Why We Need to Protect Public Libraries

We live in a “diverse and often fractious country,” writes Robert Dawson, but there are some things that unite us—among them, our love of libraries. “A locally governed and tax-supported system that dispenses knowledge and information for everyone throughout the country at no cost to its patrons is an astonishing thing,” the photographer writes in the introduction to his book, The Public Library: A Photographic Essay. “It is a shared commons of our ambitions, our dreams, our memories, our culture, and ourselves.”

But what do these places look like? Over the course of 18 years, Dawson found out. Inspired by “the long history of photographic survey projects,” he traveled thousands of miles and photographed hundreds of public libraries in nearly all 50 states. Looking at the photos, the conclusion is unavoidable: American libraries are as diverse as Americans. They’re large and small, old and new, urban and rural, and in poor and wealthy communities. Architecturally, they represent a range of styles, from the grand main branch of the New York Public Library to the humble trailer that serves as a library in Death Valley National Park, the hottest place on Earth. “Because they’re all locally funded, libraries reflect the communities they’re in,” Dawson said in an interview. “The diversity reflects who we are as a people.”

(Continue Reading)

4 days ago
2,367 notes
transitmaps:

1914 Hoch und Untergrundbahn Map, Sophie-Charlotte-Platz, Berlin
One of 26 panels on the walls of the platforms of this U-Bahn station that show the history of the subway before the First World War.
Source: bentchristensen14/Flickr

transitmaps:

1914 Hoch und Untergrundbahn Map, Sophie-Charlotte-Platz, Berlin

One of 26 panels on the walls of the platforms of this U-Bahn station that show the history of the subway before the First World War.

Source: bentchristensen14/Flickr

1 week ago
51 notes
bobcronkphotography:

Party on the Fremont - Portland, Oregon. For the annual Portland Bridge Pedal, the bridges are closed to cars so 19,000 bicycles can have their turn. This is a photo of the Fremont Bridge which is normally full of cars but today is an opportunity for selfies and celebration.

bobcronkphotography:

Party on the Fremont - Portland, Oregon. For the annual Portland Bridge Pedal, the bridges are closed to cars so 19,000 bicycles can have their turn. This is a photo of the Fremont Bridge which is normally full of cars but today is an opportunity for selfies and celebration.

(via fuckyeahportland)

1 week ago
202 notes
engineeringhistory:

Power plant for Boston Elevated Railway Co., circa 1911

engineeringhistory:

Power plant for Boston Elevated Railway Co., circa 1911

1 week ago
73 notes

thisbigcity:

landscarch:

Wow, is this oldschool or the future?

Wuppertaler Schwebebahn, Germany

Good question!

(yes this is real)

#GERMANY

5 days ago
2,615 notes
grayishpookie:

Took a peak at how the new Vikes stadium is coming #mlps #mn

grayishpookie:

Took a peak at how the new Vikes stadium is coming #mlps #mn

1 week ago
2 notes

magictransistor:

Germaine Krull, Passagewerk (Arcades Project), Paris, ca. 1926.

(Source: smashingreader.com, via raedenzen)

1 week ago
180 notes

smallandtinyhomeideas:

via futurohouse.net

The Futuro House was designed in 1968 by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen. It was commissioned as a “holiday house” or vacation home. Because it would be used in a mountainside setting, the structure needed to be easy to transport to the site, low maintenance and shed snow easily. The final design of the Futuro House met all those criteria. It’s just over 26 feet in diameter and came completely equipped with custom furnishings that fit the interesting shape of this house.
1 week ago
893 notes